• Rachael Inwood

Five benefits of learning an instrument as an adult

It's never too late to start learning to play a musical instrument. Many benefits of learning a new instrument can have on you, both physically and socially. Listed below are five benefits of playing an instrument, that you might not have thought off. 


1) Improves your mind

What better way to keep your mind active and stave of the effects that ageing has on your bring then there is then music. Playing a musical instrument uses all the areas of your brain. It is the mind’s equivalent of doing a whole body workout. It keeps your mind active. Studies have shown that learning music changes the structure of the brain. It can also improve long term memory. Landry (2017) discovered that playing an instrument can increase reaction times [1]. 


2) Improves your social life

If you play in a band, it is a way of getting you out of the house. It is a great way to meet new people. If you don’t like talking to new people, you can don’t have to as the focus is on playing your instruments together. Playing music with others can strengthen bonds with other people. 


3) Improves your self-esteem

Being able to play a piece of music can improve your self-esteem and confidence. Especially if the composition one of your favourites. 


4) Improves blood flow 

Studies have shown that music lessons can increase blood flow in the left hemisphere of the brain [2]. Having a good blood flow is good for brain health, as it brings oxygen and other nutrients needed in the brain. Good blood flow in the brain can help delay or reverse the effects of ageing [3].


5) Improves stress

Playing an instrument can help to lower stress. It is a way of escaping from work and family pressures and focusing on something different. 


After reading about the five benefits of learning an instrument, why would you not want to learn one? There are many advantages of learning an instrument as an adult, which I will explore in my next post. 


References

[1] https://musiceducationworks.wordpress.com/2017/01/24/musicians-respond-faster-to-sensory-stimuli/

[2] https://www.universityherald.com/articles/9324/20140509/music-blood-brain-liverpool-language-hemisphere-psychology.htm

[3]https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/04/110412131921.htm